Measuring Meritocracy in the Public Sector in Europe: a New National and Sub-National Indicator

Type: · Author(s): Nicholas Charron, Carl Dahlström, Victor Lapuente · Published:
Since the late nineteenth century, the presence of an independent and meritocratic bureaucracy has been posited as an advantage for effective bureaucratic behaviour and a means of limiting patrimonial networks and corruption, among other benefits. There is little consensus on how the features of an independent and meritocratic bureaucracy should be measured across countries, however, […] Read More

Measuring Political Corruption from Audit Results: A New Panel of Brazilian Municipalities

Type: · Author(s): Bianca Vaz Mondo · Published:
Comparative research on corruption has always faced challenges on how to reliably measure this phenomenon. Indicators based on perceptions of or experience with corruption are the most common approaches, but these methods have also faced criticism regarding limitations to their conceptual and measurement validity. A number of scholars have thus sought to develop alternative, more […] Read More

Opening Public Officials’ Coffers: A Quantitative Analysis of the Impact of Financial Disclosure Regulation on National Corruption Levels

Type: · Author(s): Gustavo A. Vargas, David Schlutz · Published:
Disclosure of income, assets and conflicts of interest can serve as powerful public accountability tools to draw attention to the abuse of public office, help prosecute corrupt offenders and create a culture of scrutiny in the public sector that deters corruption. Based on data of the World Bank’s Public Accountability Mechanisms initiative, we present the […] Read More

Measuring Control of Corruption by a New Index of Public Integrity

Type: · Author(s): Alina Mungiu-Pippidi, Ramin Dadašov · Published:
While the last 20 years saw the invention of corruption rankings, allowing comparison between countries and the shaming of corrupt governments, such measurements are largely based on the perceptions of experts, lacking both specificity and transparency. New research, based on a comprehensive theory of governance defined as the set of formal and informal institutions determining […] Read More

Measuring Government Favouritism Objectively: The Case of Romanian Public Construction Sector

Type: · Author(s): Mădălina Doroftei · Published:
Government favouritism in the allocation of public funds raises costs for any society in which corruption prevails. Particularistic transactions can be identified in three different situations: uncompetitive awards of public contracts when there is only one “competitive” tender, when public money is spent on contracts supplied by politically connected firms, and a situation of capture […] Read More

An Objective Corruption Risk Index Using Public Procurement Data

Type: · Author(s): Mihály Fazekas, István János Tóth, Lawrence Peter King · Published:
In order to address the lack of reliable indicators of corruption, this article develops a composite indicator of high-level institutionalised corruption through a novel ‘Big Data’ approach. Using publicly available electronic public procurement records in Hungary, we identify “red flags” in the public procurement process and link them to restricted competition and recurrent contract award […] Read More

For a New Generation of Objective Indicators in Governance and Corruption Studies

Type: · Author(s): Alina Mungiu-Pippidi · Published:
The measurement of corruption is an old challenge of both academics and the policy community, due to the absence of a unanimously agreed upon definition and the widespread (although inaccurate) belief that owing to its informal and hidden nature, corruption is an unobservable phenomenon. The articles in this issue challenge this belief. Read More