Collusion between politicians and journalists in the context of wiretapping of journalists

Type: · Author(s): Andrej Školkay · Published:
This case study reports about the collusion scandal behind the widespread wiretapping operations of various journalists. The report, however, focuses mainly on one part of the affair, namely the clear collusion between a journalist from the daily Pravda, and a top politician – a Member of Parliament, whose conversations were also recorded. MP Robert Kaliňák […] Read More

Can a “Lone wolf” quasi-investigative journalist substitute low functionality of the law enforcement system?

Type: · Author(s): Andrej Školkay · Published:
The present article analyzes a relatively unusual case, in which a quasi-investigative journalist, working in an entirely independent capacity, succeeded in uncovering and foiling an international money laundering attempt. This extremely significant story reveals the existence of a complex legal framework for tackling money-laundering operations in the EU. In this particular instance, local police and […] Read More

Ideology, Party Systems and Corruption Voting in European Democracies

Type: · Author(s): Nicholas Charron, Andreas Bågenholm · Published:
What is the impact of corruption on citizens’ voting behavior? There is a growing literature on an increasingly ubiquitous puzzle in many democratic countries: that corrupt officials continue to be re-elected by voters. In this study we address this issue with a novel theory and newly collected original survey data for 24 European countries. The […] Read More

Learning from Virtuous Circles

Type: · Author(s): Alina Mungiu-Pippidi · Published:
Once of interest mainly to specialists, the problem of explaining how institutions change is now a primary concern not only of economists, but of the international donor community as well. Many have come to believe that political institutions are decisive in shaping economic institutions and, with them, the course of innovation and investment that leads […] Read More

Indignation or Resignation: The Implications of Transparency for Societal Accountability

Type: · Author(s): Monika Bauhr, Marcia Grimes · Published:
International organizations, policy experts, and nongovernmental organizations promote greater governmental transparency as a crucial reform to enhance accountability and curb corruption. Transparency is predicted to deter corruption in part by expanding the possibilities for public or societal accountability, that is, for citizens and citizen associations to monitor, scrutinize, and act to hold public office holders […] Read More

Close but no Cigar: the measurement of corruption.

Type: · Author(s): Paul M Heywood and Jonathan Rose · Published:
Abstract : The financial cost of corruption has recently been estimated at more than 5 per cent of global GDP. Yet, despite the widespread agreement that corruption is one of the most pressing policy challenges facing world leaders, it remains as widespread today, possibly even more so, as it was when concerted international attention began being […] Read More

‘Finding God’ or ‘Moral Disengagement’ in the Fight Against Corruption in Developing Countries? Evidence from India and Nigeria

Type: · Author(s): Dr Heather Marquette · Published:
There are growing calls for religion to be used in the fight against corruption based on theassumption that religious people are more concerned with ethics than the non-religious,despite the fact that many of the most corrupt countries in the world also rank highly in termsof religiosity. This paper looks at the evidence in the current […] Read More

Becoming Denmark: Historical Designs of Corruption Control

Type: · Author(s): Alina Mungiu-Pippidi · Published:
Why do some societies manage to control corruption so it manifests itself only occasionally, as an exception, while other societies do not and remain systemically corrupt? And is the superior performance of this first group of countries a result of what they do or of who they are? Most current anticorruption strategies presume the former, which is why institutions from […] Read More

The Legacies of 1989: The Transformative Power of Europe Revisited

Type: · Author(s): Alina Mungiu-Pippidi · Published:
Why has the EU succeeded in promoting democracy in the new member states but failed in promoting good governance?  This essay seeks to answer this question first by distinguishing governance from political regimes, and second by exploring to what extent national governance—which is defined as the set of formal and informal institutions that determine who […] Read More