University College London, UK (UCL)

Website: www.ucl.ac.uk/

university college london

University College London (UCL) is one of the world’s leading multidisciplinary universities. More than 4,000 academic and research staff at UCL are dedicated to research and teaching of the highest standards. Their research approach is built on foundations of excellence in the fundamental disciplines, encouraging UCL people to work together and transform society with their ideas and innovations.

Alena V. Ledeneva

Alena V. Ledeneva

Alena V. Ledeneva is Professor of Politics and Society at the School of Slavonic and East European Studies, University College London, UK. She studied Economics at the Novosibirsk State University (1986) and Social and Political Theory at the University of Cambridge (Newnham College, M.Phil.1992; Ph.D.1996). She’s been a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at New Hall, Cambridge in 1996-1999; a Senior Fellow at the Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies, Harvard University (2005); a Simon Professor at the University of Manchester (2006) and a Visiting Professor at Sciences Po, Paris (2010). She was a Valdai Discussion Club participant in 2005-2007. She is author of a number of books How Russia Really Works (Cornell University Press, 2006); Unwritten Rules (Centre for European Reform, 2001); Russia’s Economy of Favours (Cambridge University Press, 1998) and many articles, as well as co-editor of Bribery and Blat in Russia (Macmillan, 2000) and Economic Crime in Russia (Kluwer Law International, 2000). Her expertise is on Russian cases in London courts, corruption; informal economy; economic crime; informal practices in corporate governance; role of networks and patron-client relationships in Russia and other post-communist societies.

Roxana Bratu

Roxana Bratu

Roxana Bratu joined the UCL School of Slavonic & East European Studies in February 2013 as a researcher on the EU FP7 ANTICORRP project. Previously she has conducted her PhD at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) in the Sociology Department. Roxana Bratu's doctoral dissertation focused on the process of accessing European Union funding in Romania. While at the LSE, she taught introductory undergraduate courses on Sociology, Statistics and Criminology.

Seán Hanley

Seán Hanley

Seán Hanleyis Senior Lecturer in East European Politics at University College London. His interests include the development of new anti-establishment parties and movements; right-wing politics in Central and Eastern Europe; and comparative methodology. He has a special interest in Czech politics and is author of The New Right in the New Europe: Czech transformation and right-wing politics, 1989-2006 (Routledge 2007).

Sevan Ghazaryan

Sevan Ghazaryan

I joined the UCL School of Slavonic and East European Studies as a graduate student on the International Masters programme in Economy, State and Society with reference to Central and Eastern Europe (IMESS). I spent the second year of the double-degree programme at Charles University in Prague where the focus of my research was the implications of the Eurasian integration for Armenia.

My specific area of interest within this academic programme was the political economy of post-Soviet integration. In 2009 I was admitted to the American University of Armenia where in 2011 I got a MBA degree. My previous experience in the field includes attending ‘Yerevan School of Political Studies of the Council of Europe’. Then I confirmed my interest in policy research in joining the programme for the entry-level political analysts at ‘Armenian Center for National and International Studies’ (ACNIS). My previous experience within the EU FP7 ANTICORRP project includes assisting in research on governance improvement policies in Georgia.

Allan Sikk

Allan Sikk

Allan Sikk is a Lecturer in Baltic Politics at the School of Slavonic and East European Studies, University College London. He joined UCL in 2007, after working for the Estonian parliament’s research service. He has published in the European Journal of Political Research, Party Politics, the Journal of Communist Studies and Transition Politics and the Journal of Baltic Politics. His main research interests relate to electoral and party politics, new political parties and to the impact of country size on political institutions.

Andrew Wilson

Andrew Wilson

Andrew Wilson is Reader in Ukrainian Studies at University College London (a.wilson@ssees.ucl.ac.uk). He has worked extensively on the comparative politics of the post-Soviet states since 1990. His latest book Belarus: The Last European Dictatorship was published by Yale University Press in October 2011. His other recent books include The Ukrainians: Unexpected Nation (Yale UP, third edition, 2009), Ukraine’s Orange Revolution (Yale UP, 2005) and Virtual Politics: Faking Democracy in the Post-Soviet World (Yale UP, 2005). In 2008-10 he was a Senior Policy Fellow at the European Council on Foreign Relations, where his publications include Dealing with Yanukovych’s Ukraine , The Limits of Enlargement-lite: EU and Russian Power in the Troubled Neighbourhood , Meeting Medvedev: The Politics of the Putin Succession and Can the EU Win the Peace in Georgia? (all available at www.ecfr.eu).